Give Your Sweetheart One of Our Sweet Condom Valentines.

Want to show your sweetheart you care? Then show them you care about their sexual health with these condom cover valentines. Choose from any of the five designs below, print it out, and wrap it around the contraceptive of your choice. Remember — nothing says “I Love You” better than keeping your partner safe?

 

 

 

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How to Help

The right-wing fringe of the republican party both elected and otherwise, have made denying women access to reproductive health care their #1 priority. But we don’t have to take this sitting down. Let’s act now. Here are three things you can do:

  • Send a letter to Congress, asking them to protect Planned Parenthood and the women, men, and teens who rely on us by contacting your representative and telling him or her to vote “NO” on any attempt to cut off family planning funding.

What you should have read, but might have missed, last week.

Here are a few of the stories we’ve been paying attention to:

That’s all we’ve got. What have you been reading?

Which one is a medical provider?

InfoWhich one is a medical provider?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs) are anti-choice organizations masquerading as legitimate reproductive health care providers.

They are not licensed medical facilities. Instead, the CPCs’ goal is to intentionally deceive and misinform women about their reproductive health options.

Often times women cannot tell between a CPC and a legitimate medical provider.

The New York City Council has introduced legislation that would change this, and force CPCs to be upfront about the services they do and do not provide.

Help us make sure this legislation passes.

 

What you should have read, but might have missed, last week.

Here are a few of the stories we’ve been paying attention to:

That’s all we’ve got. What have you been reading?

Thank you.

To all the amazing women who shared their stories of what Roe v. Wade has meant to them. Thank you for your courage, and for your openess.

 

For everyone else, you too can still share your story, either in the comments below or by emailing us. Or, just read the whole series here.

What Roe Means to Caitlin

In honor of the 38th anniversary of Roe V. Wade, we’re sharing stories from our supporters of what Roe has meant to them. Want to share your story? Leave it in the comments below or email us. You can read the whole series here.

“When I was a child, my mother wanted me to know that I could be anything I wanted to be not in spite of, but because I was a girl. I grew up thinking there wasn’t anything I couldn’t do.

Abortion wasn’t really on my radar at all until middle school. It made me uncomfortable to think about, so I didn’t. By the time I got to high school and then college, I realized that the issue of the legality of abortion is about so much more than the procedure itself. It’s about women’s ability to control their own lives at the very core of that life: their physical bodies. The idea that people were trying to take away abortion rights, and limit them, forcing women to have babies, or on the other side of the coin, discouraging women from having babies or forcing them to give up their babies, and then denying them birth control, and that the most vulnerable women, young women, poor women, and minorities, are the most susceptible and indeed the targets of this reproductive violence, makes me physically ill.

Roe vs. Wade is to me a basic acknowledgement on behalf of the nation that this battle was already fought and women won the basic right of privacy when it comes to what they do with their pregnancies. It’s not everything by a long shot. It obviously doesn’t protect women from restrictions- many states have them. It doesn’t provide for poor women and their babies, or pay for their birth control. These are the things we still have to fight for and that many are fighting for, but Roe is a place to stand, a crucial victory we shouldn’t have to defend nearly 40 years later.”

-Caitlin, Age 23

Want to share your story? Leave it in the comments below or email us.

What Roe Meant to Andrea.

Today is the the 38th anniversary of Roe V. Wade. To honor it, we’re sharing stories from our supporters of what Roe has meant to them. Want to share your story? Leave it in the comments below or email us. You can read the whole series here.

“Several years ago, I was talking with my Aunt, a person I respected a lot. She was a cattle rancher out West most of her life, one of the pioneers in growing range-fed cattle. However, she grew up in New York City in the 1920s and 1930s.

She told me that her first job was working in a doctor’s office as a receptionist. She said that almost every week, a woman would come into the office for help because she was bleeding from her uterus. The woman would be bleeding because she had tried to use a wire coat hanger to abort a fetus (or some back-alley abortionist had).

The coat hanger had been unwound and made into a sharp stick to poke in her uterus to cause the abortion. My Aunt told me that many times, women came too late to save their own lives. The end of the hanger had pierced the uterine wall beyond repair. There was massive infection and hemorrhaging. The women either died in the doctor’s office, or soon after, in the hospital, despite every attempt to save her.

My Aunt said she came to understand that she had to support legal abortion because she saw so many women die in their desperation not to have a child. And then she saw the devastation this caused in families in her community. Children lost beloved mothers. Husbands lost beloved wives. Parents lost beloved daughters. Friends lost beloved friends. This helped convinced me how important it is to support complete women’s healthcare.”

— Andrea

Want to share your story? Leave it in the comments below or email us.

What Roe Meant to Rosalyn

In honor of the 38th anniversary of Roe V. Wade, we’re sharing stories from our supporters of what Roe has meant to them. Want to share your story? Leave it in the comments below or email us. You can read the whole series here.

“In the early 60s while a college student I got pregnant. Abortion was illegal, and though my parents were liberal I didn’t want to involve them. My boyfriend found someone through his father. It cost a fortune back then. We borrowed money from many friends and years later I’d meet people who said, yeah aren’t you the girl that had an abortion. The bad girl reputation followed me for years.

I had no anesthetic and the doctor took more care counting the cash than he did with me. He said, “Don’t cry.” After the abortion I went to the bathroom and sobbed. He had his nurse haul me out, and told me if there was anything wrong don’t call. I bled thought I was dying, but was OK. I’m a grandmother of two.

Now, as a professor, I have helped dozens of students continue their education. Some were excellent students who began to not show up for class. When I inquired they told me they were pregnant and giving up. I’ve arranged legal, inexpensive safe abortions for them at Planned Parenthood and want to keep it that way. I hear from these students now mothers, lawyers, and social workers and they thank me for helping them with their abortions.”

— Rosalyn, 64

Want to share your story? Leave it in the comments below or email us.